Holabird Western Americana Collections' Objects of Our Affection Auction, held February 14-17 in Reno, grosses $356,000

Large Native American-themed oil painting by Nevada gaming artist Franz Trevors (American, 1907-1980), impressive at 5 feet by 8 feet and titled War Party on the Move ($6,250).

Regina 20 ¾ inch, style 26 music box built in 1899, boasting magnificent, bright and rich sound, with 23 metal discs 20 ¾ inches in diameter ($3,625).

Stock certificate for the Pennsylvania & Lake Superior (Mich.) Copper Company, dated Dec. 25, 1845, one of the very earliest Michigan mining stocks ($1,125).

Ornate sterling silvered Mexican Charro parade-style saddle used in the Pasadena Rose Parade around 1940, with a matching sabre, sombrero and other accoutrements ($4,500).

Collection of about 40 California arrowheads and points, plus a 1902 Indian head penny, nicely framed ($437).

The top lot overall was a large (5' by 8') Native American-themed oil painting by Nevada gaming artist Franz Trevors (1907-1980) that sold for $6,250.

The auction was packed with over 2,500 lots of numismatics, mining collectibles, Americana, railroad memorabilia and more. It was held online and in the Reno gallery and grossed a total of $356,000.”

— Fred Holabird

RENO, NV, UNITED STATES, February 26, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — A large Native American-themed oil painting by Nevada gaming artist Franz Trevors sold for $6,250, an ornate sterling silvered Mexican Charro parade-style saddle used in the Pasadena Rose Parade around 1940 brought $4,500, and a collection of 45 Alaska tokens fetched $5,375 in Holabird Western Americana Collections’ four-day auction held Feb. 14-17.

The Objects of Our Affection auction was packed with over 2,500 lots of numismatics, mining collectibles, Americana, railroad memorabilia and more. It was held online and in the Holabird gallery located at 3555 Airway Drive (Suite #308) in Reno. The overall gross was $356,000, as 2,450 people registered to bid online via iCollector, LiveAuctioneers, Invaluable and Auctionzip.

Featured were Part 1 of the John Reynolds collection of exonumia (numismatic items such as tokens, medals and scrip) and Americana; the Benjamin Fauver collection of counter tokens; the Bill Bliss collection of Potosi Mine (Nevada) gold and silver ingots; and numismatics, to include Masonic pennies, coins, medals, so-called dollars, tokens, shell cards, wooden money and dies.

Also offered were original James Marshall California Gold Rush collectibles; mining equipment, maps, ephemera, USGS folios and rare stock certificates; art (including works by Franz Trevors and William Forrest Martin, plus Japanese Netsuke); a whiskey and beer shot collection; vintage baseball and boxing collectibles; stocks and bonds from the Ken Prag collection; and other items.

Day 1, on Friday, February 14th, featured 74 lots of artwork, general Americana (to include jewelry, pocket watches, souvenir spoons, souvenir plates, ephemera (geographically sorted), miscellaneous items (including decoys, books, music, toys and more), an mining artifacts and ephemera (including books, more geographically sorted ephemera, equipment and other items.

The star lot of Day 1 was the oil painting by Franz Trevors (American, 1907-1980). The work, 5 feet by 8 feet and titled War Party on the Move, was commissioned by Felix Turrillas, Jr., the owner of Felix’s Bank Club in Lovelock, Nevada, and was rendered in the style of C.M. Russell. It had no signature because it was repaired for the Bank Club decades ago and, in the process, Trevors’s signature was erased. The painting depicted Native Americans in an outdoor setting.

Other Day 1 performers included a Regina 20 ¾ inch, style 26 music box built in 1899, boasting magnificent, bright and rich sound, with 23 metal discs 20 ¾ inches in diameter ($3,625); a five-star, ball-tipped “Deputy Sheriff” badge from Denver, Colorado, circa 1880s-1890s ($531); and a large Nevada steam-driven hoist, having no cable but great as a major mine display ($3,125).

Day 2, on Saturday, February 15th, was dedicated to almost entirely to geographically sorted stocks and bonds (with categories that include mining, railroad, transportation and general). Also offered were railroad artifacts and ephemera. In all, 643 lots crossed the auction block on Day 2.

On Day 2 a stock certificate for Edison Phonographs, Ltd. (N.J.), signed by Thomas Edison himself as president and issued on April 5, 1922 to Henry Lanahan in the amount of one share, garnered $2,625; while a stock certificate for the Pennsylvania & Lake Superior (Mich.) Copper Company, dated Dec. 25, 1845 and one of the earliest Michigan mining stocks, rose to $1,125.

Day 3, on Sunday, February 16th, was a dream for fans of numismatics. Featured were coins (encased and elongated, Masonic and general), medals and so-called dollars, ingots, currency, exonumia, ephemera, tokens (shell cards and geographic sort), wooden money, dies and hobbs.

The Alaska token collection – 45 tokens, with various cities represented, including the Heraldic Art silver medal of Alaska statehood in 1959, was one of the day’s top lots. Also sold was a well-worn Italian Republic of Milan one lira silver coin from 1791 with an image of Leopold II on the obverse and counter-stamped by Sacramento, Calif. druggist J. L. Polhemus, hit $2,375.

Day 4, on Monday, February 17th, concluded the sale with a flourish. Offered were firearms and militaria, cowboy collectibles, Native Americana, bottles and glass, sports collectibles and bargains and dealer specials to include general Americana, numismatics and stocks and bonds. The stocks and bonds comprised several categories, to include mining, railroad and general.

The silvered, Mexican Charro parade-style saddle was the big attraction on Day 4. The high quality, ornate saddle came with a matching sabre, sombrero and other accoutrements. The sword had a Mexican engraved scene on the blade and was made by “A. Aragon, Oax.” The fact that the saddle was used in the Pasadena Rose Parade around World War II boosted its cachet.

Other Day 4 top lots included a group of nine photo pins for the Oakland Oaks (Calif.) baseball team (1903-1955), made by Whitehead & Hoag Co. of San Francisco, dating to around 1910 ($2,375); a token for the Pioneer Base Ball Club (Springfield, Mass., organized in April 1858), with a pictorial of a hitter on the obverse, one of 125 struck ($1,312); and a collection of about 40 California arrowheads and points, plus a 1902 Indian head penny, nicely framed ($437).
Holabird Western Americana Collections is always in the hunt for quality Americana and coin consignments, bottles, advertising and other collections for future auctions. To consign a single piece or a collection, you may call Fred Holabird at 775-851-1859 or 844-492-2766; or, you can e-mail him at fredholabird@gmail.com. To learn more about Holabird Western Americana Collections and the firm’s calendar of upcoming auction events, please visit www.fhwac.com.
# # # #

Fred Holabird
Holabird Western Americana Collections
+1 775-851-1859
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Source: EIN Presswire

Champion Bird Dog Handler Shawn Kinkelaar to be Featured on Close Up Radio

EFFINGHAM, ILLINOIS, UNITED STATES, February 26, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — One could call Shawn Kinkelaar the leader of the pack or the alpha male, because his career is all about dogs and winning. He is recognized among the top trainers and handlers of dogs for a special purpose—bird hunting and field trials related to that. It’s a sport he loves for the natural beauty of the outdoors, the broad land, the trees and the majestic horses. In fact, he says the dogs were one of the last things he came to cherish as a youth, when his family introduced him to riding and competing.

Another early reason he loved this sport was the travel. Shawn says chuckling.

“It’s a complicated life. It’s the life of a gypsy.”

Shawn actually spends about 5 months each year at his training camp in Carson South Dakota, which he calls his second home. This is where Shawn evaluates and develop dogs, ages 1.5 to 9, and determines those who have what it takes to compete before the judging panel. Then he winters in Georgia. Shawn spends the rest of his time on the road, taking his champion dogs to competitions that mimic bird hunting. In these competitions though, dogs will run a much greater range and stand in footprint much longer than if they were actually working. They get rated for their performance and bloodline traits. And they usually come out on top. Shawn and his dogs have broken records for US Invitational Wins, he has been named National Handler of the Year 5 different times, prepared the National Dog of the Year in several successive years and won more than 14 Shooting Dog Championships overall.

Shawn notes that certain aspects of winning come through the dog’s breeding (English Pointers, Setters, Brittany’s, German Shorthairs, etc.) but a good part of it is the training. He says he tries not to take anything out of a dog, capitalizing instead on their natural abilities. He says it is also important that each dog have a sense of freedom in their own mind. Over the years, he has both trained and handled dogs and achieved top honors. He loves competing, showing off a great dog, raising great dog after great dog, and bringing out their talents and pointing instincts.

Shawn was a teen when his family took him out with them, and barely 20 when the famous Herb Holmes took him under his wing. After that he had many more ride-along opportunities, training experiences and role models. They all helped build his knowledge and shape the program that has now become all his own. By the time he graduated from high school, he knew what he wanted to do for life. And it’s been a great ride!

Close Up Radio will feature Shawn Kinkelaar in an interview with Doug Llewelyn on Thursday, Feb. 27th at 11:00am EST

Listen to the show on BlogTalkRadio

If you have questions for our guest, please call 347-996-3369

For more information about Shawn and his life’s work, visit https://www.shawnkinkelaar.com

Lou Ceparano
Close Up Radio
+1 (631) 850-3314
email us here
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Source: EIN Presswire

Andrew Jones Auctions' first Collections Curated by Designers of Distinction auction, Feb. 23, totals nearly $2 million

The top lot of the sale was this beautiful ebonized Bosendorfer black lacquered grand piano, Model B225, serial number 38972-9807, circa 1986, 88 inches in length ($46,250).

Fine English cut and molded glass 24-light chandelier, made in the mid-19th century by Perry & Co., approximately 78 inches in height and 52 inches in diameter ($40,000).

North Italian Rococo parcel gilt blue and polychrome japanned Chinoiserie decorated commode, Pietro Massa, Piedmont, mid-18th century, 38 ½ inches tall ($27,500).

Pair of Regence style gilt and white painted Maison Jansen bergères, 20th century, 39 inches tall, 31 inches wide, depth of seat 22 ½ inches ($12,500).

Chinese huanghuali yoke back armchair dating to the Ming Dynasty, 44 inches tall, 21 inches wide, depth of seat 15 inches ($37,500).

The results were nothing short of phenomenal, as 97 percent of lots found new owners. The event was held online and at the gallery in downtown Los Angeles.

It was exciting to see so many decorators, collectors and grand millennials battle for each lot. It’s a great shot in the arm for traditional quality works with important provenance.”

— Andrew Jones

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES, February 26, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — The results of Andrew Jones Auctions’ first-ever auction of Collections Curated by Designers of Distinction were nothing short of phenomenal, as 97 percent of lots found new owners in a sale that totaled just under $2 million. The event was held February 23rd, online and in the downtown Los Angeles gallery at 2221 South Main Street.

The sale comprised nearly 500 lots, pulled from six California collections assembled by legends of interior design: Kalef Alaton, Craig Wright, Henrix Allardyce, Therien & Company, Inc., Steven Volpe and James Lumsden. Luxuriously upholstered chairs, elegant occasional tables, Chinoiserie decoration, fine art selections and exquisite objects struck a chord with bidders.

"We seem to have turned back the clock to a time when richly appointed interiors were the paradigm,” said Andrew Jones, president and CEO of Andrew Jones Auctions. “It was exciting to see so many decorators, collectors and grand millennials – many of them new clients – battle for each lot. It’s a great shot in the arm for traditional quality works with important provenance.”

A busy three-day preview in a gorgeously presented gallery led to a packed room on auction day with over 100 in-room clients, a full bank of phone bidders and two active online platforms bringing in buyers from around the world. Approximately 2,500 people registered to bid online.

Following are some of the major highlights from the auction. Internet bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. Also, 430 in house registrations for absentee, phone and in-room bidding were recorded. All prices quoted include a sliding scale buyer’s premium.

The top lot of the sale was a beautiful ebonized Bosendorfer grand piano from the estate of Yasuko and Maury Kraines that fetched $46,250. From the same collection, a spectacular Victorian glass 24-light chandelier by Perry & Co. reached $40,000. The estate of Francis A. Martin III included a chic pair of Louis XVI bronze and marble étagères that achieved $45,000.

A wonderful collection from a Beverly Hills residence was highlighted by a colorful North Italian Rococo japanned commode in the manner of Pietro Massa, Piedmont that gaveled for $27,500, and a sinuous Chinese huanghuali armchair knocked down for $37,500. Also, Craig Wright’s stylish pair of Regence style bergères by Maison Jansen changed hands for $12,500.

Andrew Jones Auctions’ next big event will be a double-header of UnReserved on Main St. and DTLA (Downtown Los Angeles) Collections & Estates auctions on Saturday, March 21st and Sunday March 22nd, also online and in the gallery. Featured will be antique furniture, fine jewelry and silver, fine art and decorations. The preview begins on Thursday, March 19th.

Andrew Jones Auctions opened in summer 2018 and is the only full-service fine art and antiques auction house in downtown Los Angeles. The staff has a wealth of knowledge and international experience, having worked for many years at major auction houses in America and Europe, scouring property from across North America. The firm’s auctions are diverse and eclectic and feature fine items in many collecting categories spanning the 16th through the 21st centuries.

To learn more about Andrew Jones Auctions and the UnReserved on Main St. and DTLA (Downtown Los Angeles) Collections & Estates auctions planned for Saturday, March 21st and Sunday March 22nd, online and in the gallery, please visit www.andrewjonesauctions.com. You can reach the firm by phone at 213-748-8008, or via email at info@andrewjonesauctions.com.

# # # #

Aileen Ward
Andrew Jones Auctions
+1 213-748-8008
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Brooke Horan Williams Book Review of Creative and Successful Set Designs

Brooke Horan Williams Discusses How to Make Imaginative Stage Sets with Limited Resources

AUSTIN , TEXAS, UNITED STATES, February 25, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — When creating a stage play for theater, one of the first projects after scriptwriting is setting up the stage. Just as the scriptwriting needs be written to have the characters believable, the stage setup needs to have special priority as well. In this book review, Brooke Horan Williams looks at Todd Mufanti’s book entitled Creative and Successful Set Designs: How to Make Imaginative Stage Sets with Limited Resources. In his book, Mufanti shares some experiences of his 40+ years’ experience as a set designer and university professor and shows how to find creative and inexpensive solutions for designing theater stages.

When one thinks of stage setting what comes to mind? For most of us, we think it’s all about creating a stage background so the play allows one’s imagination to unfold as the story is being told. However, Brooke says, Mufanti believes the role of a successful set design is “to create an environment that supports the playwright’s point of view as interpreted by the director and the actors.” The author goes on to say that, for this reason, no two plays will be the same set as every production will be different.

Brooke Horan Williams mentions that Creative and Successful Set Designs is one of her best resources that she recommends to newcomers and is a favorite among drama teachers everywhere. It contains dozens of photos and technical designs and gives step-by-step suggestions for creative stage design for high school theater. The author also discusses the spatial relationship of the stage and auditorium and how to use this to your advantage. One aspect Brooke likes that is especially helpful is small scale blueprints of stages. This helps the reader envision how the stage will look in real life.

Another thing Brooke Horan Williams loves about Creative and Successful Set Designs is the multitude of ideas for creating a set inexpensively. Mufanti talks about ways to convey different ideas to the audience and talks about methods that don’t require extensive building time or expense. In fact, many of the ideas he suggests are ways in which we can use the set props multiple times but in totally different ways. “This saves money for the theater in the long run,” she says. It’s easy to read and easy to follow along with as Mufanti gives plenty of examples and case studies about the ideas he recommends.

One of the bonuses inside the book, she says, is that it comes with resources and contact information for many of the props suggested. She says she can just go directly to the websites referenced without having to search for them on the internet. “This has saved me a ton of time,” she says.

Lastly, Brooke Horan Williams says that the visual creatives within the book, such as his sketches and models, help the reader understand how simplistic set adaptations can work and gives examples for many of his ideas. “Even though the book is only about 130 pages or so,” she says, “it still packs enough information and is a greater starting point for setting theater stages today. It’s one of my best all-time resources that I highly recommend.”

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Justin Williams Medical Laser: Best 4-Player Multiplayer Games

Justin Williams Medical Laser breaks down his favorite four-player games for couch co-op.

AUSTIN, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, February 25, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Multiplayer games are a time-honored tradition: most games are just more fun when you’re able to tackle them along with some friends. Justin Williams Medical Laser points out that while many of today’s best multiplayer games are online-only, with some pitting as many as 100 players against each other at once, there’s something to be said for the more intimate experience of being able to take on a game with three friends in the same room as you.

Justin Williams Medical Laser begins with an old favorite: Gauntlet is a classic four-player adventure, dating back to 1985. Originally an arcade-only venture, the game spawned many sequels and home console ports over the years. The core gameplay of Gauntlet is simple and doesn’t necessarily require teamwork, however, the game becomes much harder when attempting to play by yourself. Players choose between one of four classes based on fantasy tropes: the Warrior, Wizard, Valkyrie, or Elf. Each has their own unique strengths and weaknesses, so teamwork is necessary in later levels of the game.

Arcade games, Justin Williams Medical Laser says, are perfect for four-player adventures because arcades are already a social gathering. Two other great examples of this are The Simpsons and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade games. Both of them were released by Konami, and both follow the same basic gameplay rules: each player chooses a character to walk through the levels left to right, defeating enemies and bosses along the way. Controls were simple, using only two buttons: one to jump, and another to attack or pick up items, depending on the context.

When it comes to four-player multiplayer at home, Justin Williams Medical Laser points out some consoles have had it better than others. The Sega Dreamcast and Nintendo 64 (and later Gamecube) both had built-in four controller ports, leading to classic multiplayer games like Power Stone (originally an arcade release), Goldeneye007, and more.

Eventually, as home consoles became more sophisticated, controller ports were phased out entirely and controllers became wireless. Unfortunately, despite this revelation in technology, it seems like four-player games haven’t become any more ubiquitous—in fact, if anything, they’ve become less so. One company that’s never lost sight of having fun with your friends in the same room is Nintendo. Mario Kart and Mario Party are both perfect examples of four-player games that can be engaging to anyone. There is certainly a level of skill involved, but there are also elements of luck that can turn the entire game on its head and leave people clamoring for a rematch.

At the end of the day, no matter how much technology progresses and how impressive our online experiences become, Justin Williams Medical Laser believes there will never be a replacement for the experience of getting together for a play session.

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Spencer Shaver Denver Discusses How Businesses Can Give Back for Maximum Impact

Spencer Shaver Denver

DENVER, CO, UNITED STATES, February 25, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — As a small business owner, one of your primary objectives is to make a profit, a sizable feat in itself for many startups in the first legs of their journey. However, Spencer Shaver Denver, an experienced small business consultant and founder and executive producer of Skyward Artists Group, says that isn’t all. In addition to laying the groundwork for a successful future for your company, you should also consider ways to give back once you’ve achieved that success. He discusses the importance of entrepreneurial philanthropy and how to go about it wisely.

Spencer Shaver Denver cites research which indicates that while a solid paycheck is still the primary motive for most job-seekers, another significant incentive is finding a job and company with a purpose*. Not only do modern employees want to feel they matter to their employer; but they also would prefer to work for a business that is doing its part to make the world a better place. Of course, there are myriad other reasons to give back, including the fact that, as Spencer Shaver Denver says, it is simply the right thing to do.

“We all have the power to make a positive impact on our environment,” he said. “And we all have an obligation to make a powerful difference.”

However, it is important to note that simply giving to any charity is not necessarily a responsible or effective choice. Spencer Shaver Denver, an entrepreneurial philanthropist himself, advises first researching the issues and the organizations that work to address them. For example, an organization that gives away free rice to the hungry in impoverished communities in Southeast Asia may seem like a great charity to contribute to. However, it may have unintended consequences, such as putting local rice farmers out of a job.

When selecting a cause and charity, consider the potential side effects of the operation and how closely (if at all) the organization works with and understands the local culture and socioeconomic situation. You should also consider whether you wish to contribute to solving the underlying problem or treating its effects. With the former, you’ll likely be making a more lasting impact, even if it takes a while longer to see results. Furthermore, Spencer Shaver Denver suggests considering what resources you can deploy. While money is often the best way to help organizations staffed by professionals who understand exactly where the cash can best be spent, you can also consider volunteering your time and skills to a cause.

More on Spencer Shaver Denver

Spencer Shaver’s resume is peppered with a range of impressive titles from business consultancy and entrepreneurship to philanthropy and filmography. But behind everything he does is his steadfast faith, inspiring him constantly to create in His name.

Since becoming a martial arts instructor in 1995, Spencer Shaver Denver’s fighting spirit has given him the drive needed to succeed in all of his professional ventures. Spencer Shaver looks forward to creating more meaningful work, from documentary films to business plans, while helping other creators and businesspeople explore opportunities, follow their dreams, and achieve their goals.

with a purpose* – https://www.forbes.com/sites/ashleystahl/2016/10/12/employers-take-note-heres-what-employees-really-want/#dd1102c1c83d

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Convenience, Fun and Top Names Tempt a New Generation of Collectors at PBMA

Three people look at the auction catalog while inspecting items at PBMA auction..

Top names, eclectic finds and a good time combine to bring bidders to PBMA’s Modern Art & Design auctions.

A large, colorful flower sculpture by artist Tom Wesselmann with a chair for scale sold at Palm Beach Modern Auctions.

PBMA’s Feb. 8th auction was headlined by a monumental Tom Wesselmann (American, 1931-2004) steel-cut floral bouquet, which realized $338,000 on an estimate of $150,000-200,000.

A large abstract painting by artist Ray Parker sold at PBMA,

A monumental Ray Parker (American, 1922-1990) abstract realized $91,000 on an estimate of $50,000-70,000.

A younger, more mobile audience and strong international bidding produce record results at Palm Beach Modern Auctions’ Feb. 8th sale.

If they’re bidding online, they’re on the app. If they have a phone line, they’re taking the call while out and about. One of our phone reps was certain her bidder was on a date during the call.”

— Rico Baca, auctioneer and co-owner

WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, February 25, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Art lovers flocked to South Florida – physically and virtually – for Palm Beach Modern Auctions’ February 8th Modern Art & Design sale headlined by a wall-spanning Tom Wesselmann steel-cut floral bouquet which realized $338,000. The premier sale raked in $2.1 million and recorded an overall 90% sell-through rate, a record single-day event for the firm.

“As a new generation develops buying power, the industry changes to reflect their preferences,” says Modern Auctions’ co-owner and auctioneer, Rico Baca, who also mentioned that the live audience trended towards 45-and-under as well.

“We’ve seen growth in bidding specific to mobile devices. If they’re bidding online, they’re on the app, not at their desk on a computer. If they have a phone line, they’re taking the call while out and about. One of our phone reps was certain her bidder was on a date during the call.”

“Location has become less of a factor as well,” continues Baca. “When we opened our doors eight years ago, we were in the category industry people call ‘local sale.’ That doesn’t really apply anymore – not when 65% of bidders and a bulk of consignments are coming from outside South Florida. Those numbers aren’t even considering underbidder locations.” Outside the U.S., the largest number of buyers were from the U.K. and Switzerland. Austria, Canada, Cyprus, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Russia, Spain and Venezuela were represented as well.

The auction catalog was as diverse as the audience, offering 550 lots across the spectrum of genres and price points. The Pablo Picasso Madoura ceramics, which saw a 100% sell-through rate, went to Miami, New York, London and Paris. The star of the Picasso show was the rare “Tarasque” jug (lot 125), which realized $71,500.

Filling out Session I were a monumental Ray Parker abstract in three swaths of earthy purples, which realized $91,000 on an estimate of $50,000-70,000 and two Michele Oka Doner sculptural chairs, each of which exceeded expectations. It was no surprise that all phone lines were busy on the Lynn Chadwick “Maquette IV Walking Woman” (realized $104,000 on an estimate of $40,000-60,000) and the George Ohr vase (realized $9,100 on an estimate of $300-500).

Beyond the two stunning Wesselmann “Steel Drawing” bouquets, Session II’s solid lineup included a number of perennial favorites: editions by Fairfield Porter, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, Max Ernst, Alexander Calder and Sam Francis as well as photography from Annie Leibovitz, Steven Klein and an intimate Duane Michals gelatin silver print that more than doubled its high estimate.

Session III, presented in conjunction with Urban Culture Auctions, has quickly become known for its curated blend of contemporary cool mixed with niche and nostalgia. A 102” Sebastian Wrong & Richard Woods “Wrongwoods” cabinet for Established & Sons defied its modest $1,500-2,500 estimate, realizing $9,100. Several quirky lots of Space Age electronics made their way to the West Coast. Other lots appealing to younger collectors included a Trey Parker (of South Park fame) “Cartman” drawing, a “Mouton” bookshelf, unattributed but obviously inspired by Lalanne, a new old stock vintage Andy Warhol poster dress and editions at price points perfect for entry-level collecting.

Not only was the crowd younger, but they also lingered later into the evening, said PBMA’s Rico Baca, who attributes some of that to the fact that attending a Palm Beach Modern auction is, simply put, fun.

“When you’re competing for something you want, whether your rival is in the room or on the other side of the world, there’s adrenaline involved. We send out a text alert when the sale goes live, and they jump on it.”

Modern Auctions’ next event will be Saturday, May 2nd at 12:00 noon ET. For additional information, visit www.modernauctions.com, call 561-586-5500 or email info@modernauctions.com.

Erika Chapman
Palm Beach Modern Auctions
+15613016162
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Source: EIN Presswire

Ancient Resource Auctions' March 14 online sale features authentic antiquities, ethnographic art, Natural History items

Extraordinary circa 1000-1500 AD full figure marble anthropic cohoba stand, an item used in hallucinogenic ceremonies and rarely made from stone like this example (est. $6,000-$8,000).

Marvelous 3rd century BC Etruscan terracotta head of a man, 10 inches tall and an outstanding example. His features are wonderfully modeled in high relief (est. $4,000-$5,500).

Large Byzantine double-spouted bronze lamp from the 6th or 7th century AD, 9 ¾ inches tall, a lovely example on a flared pedestal foot with an elegant rounded body (est. 7,000-$10,000).

This exceedingly rare Egyptian wooden Apis Bull figure, also from the Late Period, well carved from a single piece of cedar, should find a new owner for $5,500-$8,000.

Apulian red-figure fish plate, 4th Century BC, depicting three perch-type fish, each beautifully executed with great style and detail, 5 ½ inches diameter (est. $3,500-$4,500).

A Byzantine double-spouted bronze lamp from the 6th or 7th century AD and a circa 1000-1500 AD full figure marble anthropic cohoba stand are expected top lots.

We’re featuring an incredible selection of antiquities from a wide variety of cultures in our first major online auction of the year. Bidders are bound to get some wonderful pieces at great prices.”

— Gabriel Vandervort

MONTROSE, CA, UNITED STATES, February 24, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — A large Byzantine double-spouted bronze lamp from the 6th or 7th century AD, an extraordinary circa 1000-1500 AD full figure marble anthropic cohoba stand, and a marvelous 3rd century BC Etruscan terracotta head of a man are just a few of the highlights in Ancient Resource Auctions’ online-only Auction #82 – An Exceptional Spring Antiquities Sale.

The auction is already up and online for pre-bidding. It will go live on Saturday, March 14th, at 9 am Pacific time, and continue on through the afternoon that day. Up for bid are around 450 lots of authentic Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Near Eastern, Holy Land, Byzantine, Asian and Pre-Columbian antiquities, plus ethnographic art, Natural History items and other rare collectibles.

All lots may be viewed and bid on now, via Ancient Resource Auctions’ bidding platform, at bid.AncientResourceAuctions.com, and on its bidding apps for both Android and Apple devices. Bids can also be placed on Invaluable.com and LiveAuctioneers.com. A link to LiveAuctioneers is at https://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/161985_a82-exceptional-spring-antiquities-sale/.

“We’re featuring an incredible selection of antiquities from a wide variety of cultures in our first major online auction of the new year,” said Gabriel Vandervort, the owner of Ancient Resource Auctions, adding, “Bidders are bound to get some wonderful pieces at great prices.”

With a pre-sale estimate of $7,000-$10,000, the large Byzantine double-spouted bronze lamp is a strong candidate for top lot of the auction. The 9 ¾ inch tall lamp, on a flared pedestal foot, is lovely, with an elegant rounded body and well-preserved brown patinated surfaces with green deposits. Lamps with similar bodies and spout designs currently reside in the British Museum.

The full figure marble anthropic cohoba stand was an item used in hallucinogenic ceremonies.
A bowl of cohoba would be placed on the effigy’s head and shared among participants. The stands were rarely made from stone, like this gorgeous 12 ½ inch tall example. The figure’s head is turned backward – commonly seen in Taino Art (est. $6,000-$8,000).

The Etruscan terracotta head of a man, 10 inches tall, is an outstanding example. He is veiled and is wearing a narrow diadem decorated with rosettes. Four small pinecones adorn his forehead and his features are wonderfully modeled in high relief, his hair short and well defined. Last acquired thru Sotheby’s, the piece should garner $4,000-$5,500.

A wonderful Egyptian bronze figure of the mother goddess Mut from the Late Period (circa 664-332 BC), depicted wearing a tight-fitting gown and striated wig, with uraeus surmounted by the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt, 6 ¾ inches tall, has an estimate of $6,000-$7,500. Also, a very rare Egyptian wooden Apis Bull figure, also from the Late Period, well carved from a single piece of cedar, should garner $5,500-$8,000.

A large and beautiful Egyptian polychrome figure of the funerary deity Ptah-Sokar-Osiris from the Late Period, 25 ¼ inches tall, depicted mummiform on a rectangular integral base and with much of the original paint preserved, is expected to fetch $5,000-$8,000; while a large Greek terracotta figure of a bearded deity from the Late Hellenistic Period (2nd-1st Century BC), 20 ¾ inches tall and very well preserved, should hit $4,000-$7,000.

A wonderful Apulian red-figure fish plate from the 4th Century BC, depicting three perch-type fish, each beautifully executed with great style and detail, about 5 ½ inches in diameter, carries a pre-sale estimate of $3,500-$4,500. Also, a gorgeous Roman head of an enraptured Venus, the goddess of love, circa 2nd Century AD, likely once part of a paired statue with Pan, mounted on a marble stand, is estimated to reach $1,500-$3,000.

In addition to live and Internet bidding, phone and absentee bids will be accepted. When bidding this way, a 19.5 percent buyer’s premium will apply, versus a 24.5 percent when bidding online via LiveAuctioneers.com or Invaluable.com, and 20 percent via the Ancient Resource Auctions bidding platform and app. Previews are by appointment only; to schedule one call 818-425-9633.

Mr. Vandervort said Ancient Resource Auctions is one of the few truly specialized auction houses as it pertains to handling rare antiquities. “We’re a small operation with a true passion and dedication for ancient history,” he said, “with decades of combined experience working specifically with these items. Buyers can feel secure knowing we only offer genuine antiquities.”

Ancient Resource Auctions is always seeking quality ancient art and antiquities for future auctions. To inquire about consigning one piece or an entire collection, you may call 818-425-9633 or send an e-mail to ancientresourceauctions@yahoo.com. All inquiries are confidential.

To learn more about Ancient Resource Auctions and the Saturday, March 14th Exceptional Spring Antiquities Sale, visit www.AncientResourceAuctions.com. For more information, please call 818-425-9633; or, you can send an e-mail to ancientresourceauctions@yahoo.com.

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Gabriel Vandervort
Ancient Resource Auctions
+1 818-425-9633
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Justin Williams Laser Explores the Weirdest Video Game Spin-offs

Justin Williams Laser takes a look at some of the strangest offshoots of well-known titles.

AUSTIN, TEXAS , UNITED STATES, February 24, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Sometimes when there are beloved characters or concepts that don’t get enough screentime in the main attraction, a spin-off makes perfect sense. However, Justin Williams Laser wants to take a look at the games that have no logical reason to even exist in the first place. Sometimes a developer just wants to try something new—and sometimes, it pays off in a big way.

Justin Williams Laser first points out Pokemon Snap for the Nintendo 64. This odd spinoff moves away from the RPG gameplay of capturing and battling monsters and moves you into a photographer role. The game, which is fully 3D, moves you along a predetermined track, akin to a lightgun game or a theme park ride. Your goal is to try to capture as many good shots as you can along the way and be graded on them at the end of the “ride”. While the concept seems strange in theory, it proved to be a big hit and sold units like crazy. There were even Pokemon Snap photobooths set up in malls and Blockbusters where you could print out the shots you took of your favorite pokemon.

One spin-off that wasn’t quite as well-received, also from Nintendo but years earlier, is the Super Nintendo game Mario is Missing. In this Super Mario spinoff, much like the title suggests, Mario is missing. You must play as Luigi who, unfortunately, does not get to do any of the fun things Mario is accustomed to. Instead of skillfully racing your way through well-designed levels, picking up powerups and defeating enemies by jumping on their heads, you must walk slowly from town to town, asking people if they’ve seen your brother, and answering history questions.

Justin Williams Laser is aware this sounds like a joke, but he assures you: this game is real, and it is absolutely terrible.

Another game that doesn’t quite live up to the greatness of its original series, Justin Williams Laser points out, is Megaman Soccer, also for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Megaman, much like Mario, usually runs through levels from left to right, defeating enemies by shooting his arm cannon at them rather than bouncing off their skulls. Megaman Soccer, not surprisingly, replaces this gameplay with a soccer game. The problem is, Justin Williams Laser explains, it wasn’t a particularly fun, or good-looking, or interesting soccer game. After this outing, Megaman put down the soccer ball and stuck to the tried and true formula of weapons and explosions.

One final spin-off that no one realized they wanted until it was released: Halo Wars. This RTS release in the popular first-person shooter series may seem odd, but Halo Wars is interesting because, as Justin Williams Laser points out, Halo actually began its life as an RTS game. Halo Wars proves that the game could have survived as a strategy game, and it was so successful it was followed up with a sequel.

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire

Skip Drish, a Man of Many Talents, Discusses His 30-Year Construction Career

Skip Drish Tampa

TAMPA, FL, UNITED STATES, February 24, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Skip Drish of Tampa, FL, is a true Renaissance man. From serving his country in the U.S. military to protecting communities as a police officer, captaining boats to renovating homes, he has proven time and again his versatility and dedication to success in any endeavor. His construction career, spanning more than three decades, is itself a testament to his talent and drive.

Skip Drish is a respected State Licensed General and Electrical Contractor in Florida and Illinois. Starting from the bottom and working his way through the ranks, Skip Drish demonstrated strategic planning and utilized controlled investments, market forecasting, continuing education, and exceptional leadership, to establish a gold-star reputation in the Florida contracting and construction community. Over 30 years, he amassed a wealth of knowledge and experience while working for various construction companies, orchestrating the successful growth and expansion of a number of entities. Currently, Skip Drish Tampa stands at the helm of his own contracting firm, WorldWide Contracting, Inc.

Headquartered in Lutz, Florida, WorldWide Contracting, Inc., also has affiliate offices in Oak Brook, Illinois, Newark, Delaware, Atlanta, Georgia, and San Antonio, TX. Skip Drish said he plans to expand his national workforce further in the future.

In addition to an impressive portfolio showcasing his commitment to quality and innovation, he has garnered the widespread respect of clients and colleagues through his professionalism, dedication to quality, and exceptional customer service.

Skip Drish’s extensive educational background includes graduating with honor’s with a bachelor in science management from National-Louis University. He is also a State Certified General Contractor in Florida and a Union Carpenter and Electrician. His numerous additional certifications include certification with Square D, certification in pre-manufactured residential, commercial, and industrial buildings, fiber-optic installation and termination, certification for city water reclamation plant, Master Electrical Wireman, OSHA safety certification.

Prior to embarking on his construction career, Skip Drish was a U.S. Military Police/Investigations Corporal and Squad Leader in the U.S. and Europe from 1981 to 1984, for which service he received a U.S Army Medal for Heroism in the line of duty. After his military service, he became a police officer with the Chicago Police Department in May 1988, the start of a decades-long career in law enforcement, which has included positions in local, state, and government arenas, with titles ranging from VIP Chief Operator of his private security firm, Investigations & Security Bureau Inc. to BLS First Responder Instructor.

Skip Drish Tampa said many skills and lessons he learned in the military and law enforcement have served him well in construction and business ownership as well.

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire